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20110317
20110317
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
-ft. worth airports, radiation levels, thankfully low, have been picked up on passengers returning from japan. but the battle and the focus remain on the fukushima station and its crippled reactors. reactor number three, the scene of aerial water bombardment today, brave crew members dropped sea water in a desperate attempt to cool what is being describes as the single greatest threat. the fukushima six reactors, reactor three is the only one housing a mixed fuel known as mox, short for mixed oxide, a material made of reclaimed plutonium, the release of which would pose far more devastating effects than weave seen thus far. reactor four and its lack of water set off the biggest rift between nuclear authorities in the united states and japan. the u.s. believes the situation there is far worse than the japanese counterparts concede. the rift has led to a mini exodus of americans and others within japan. let's go now to nbc's chief environmental affairs correspondent, anne thompson. authorities in japan have just announced they may be close to restoring power to a stricken reactor, that's reacto
on the mounting nuclear crisis in japan, authorizing the first evacuations of american government employees out of the country. in addition, the state department is warning all u.s. citizens to consider leaving japan. the unpredictable weather conditions risks spreading radioactive material. that move comes as japanese crews and military helicopters brave radiation to dump sea water on to the stricken fukushima complex. the tactics are an attempt to cool overheated radium fuel that may be on the verge of spewing out more radiation. meanwhile, plant operators say they're racing to finish a new power line that could restore cooling systems and ease the crisis. still, the top u.s. nuclear regulatory official is warning american citizens within 50 miles of the complex to leave the area or at least remain indoors. testifying on capitol hill yesterday that the situation is "very serious." >> we believe that there is no water in the spent fuel pool known as number four. i would say that it is my great hope that the information that we have is not accurate. i would hope for the sake of everyone that th
>> couric: tonight, from the air and from the ground, japan launches a water assault on those damaged nuclear reactors to try to cool them. and a voluntary evacuation of americans is under way. i'm katie couric. also tonight, president obama tries to reassure this country we are safe. >> we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the west coast. >> couric: libya's moammar qaddafi vows to retake all rebel-held territory as the u.n. considers military action to stop him. and from hiroshima to fukushima, her fear that japan is on the verge of another nuclear catastrophe. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. there is so much concern in this country about nuclear radiation from jay japan that president obama went on national television today to try to calm every down. he said he does not expect harmful levels of radiation from those damaged reactors to reach hawaii, alaska, or the west coast. at the same time, the united states began evacuating americ
retaliation and destabilization of the region. but first, we turn to japan. where emergency workers are feverishly trying to cool down overheating fuel rods at the earthquake and tsunami-stricken nuclear plant. a u.n. nuclear official says the situation is "very serious." but appears to be stable. for now. the u.s. authorized the first evacuations of americans out of japan and president obama says he has asked for a comprehensive review of u.s. nuclear plant safety. correspondent greg palkot is in japan with the latest. >> reporter: there were desperate measures thursday in the fukushima nuclear plant in northeastern japan. helicopters doused water on overheating reactors to avoid a catastrophic core meltdown. the facility was sprayed down with more water from fire trucks. while authorities say there is some stabilization, they admit the method had little effect in reducing temperatures at the plant. others say even if a power line reaches coolant pumps they might not work. >> this is a very severe situation. we need to keep coolings at the fuel so that it doesn't reach criticality.
libyahrain, two wars and japan all facing problems and the president's responses are getting both praise and criticism. >>> you've seen it, you felt it, gas, food, cars, prices all going up and there's a price record that's hit a three-decade record, but could it be good? >>> how much would you pay for this red tibetan mastiff, i have a hint. he's the most expensive dog in the world. i'm in for chris jansing. the united states is evacuating the citizens that want to leave japan. a united nations forecast showing a possible radioactive plume hitting southern california tomorrow. u.s. officials insist people in japan could stay 50 miles away from the fukushima daiichi plant, much farther away than what the japanese government is telling its own people. helicopters once again scrambling to dump seawater onto this complex, and at the same time workers are racing to finish building a new power line that could restart the cooling system and thus give the relief to the overheating nuclear rods that everybody has been watching. officially the death toll now stands at more than 5y 300, abo
and strong allies in japan, as they've come to terms and wrestled with this challenging situation. most of you know that our equipment that we sent over to support them has arrived on a c-17. we sent a team of 33 additional people which were in addition to the six people we already had out there in japan. they had over 17,000 pounds of equipment with them. they've unpacked that. they've taken the two pods that do the aerial measurement of ground depositions and mounted them, one on a fixed-wing aircraft and one on a helicopter and we flew those aircraft on their first missions. we've been collecting information as they've come back. we're in the process of sharing that information with our japanese hosts and while that's still being looked at, preliminary indications are that they're consistent with the recommendations that came down from the nuclear regulatory commission. so indications are, it looks like the 50-mile evacuation was prudent. other countries around the world continue to do what they can do support the japanese as they lead this effort to address this challenge. we've had
ideas, but they are specific things. and wh) you heard people saying what's happening in japan so far is worse than three mile island, but not as bad as chernobyl, well, okay. it is good to understand that, but it is also good to understand that there's a lot of room between the consequences of three mile island and chernobyl. not just the magnitude and type of accidents themselves, but the consequences of those accidents. how much radioactivity was released, and what it did to people. the on-going crisis in japan is about trying to minimize the amount of radiation that's going to be released from the reactors at daiichi. understanding the difference between this disaster and previous nuclear disasters is empirical. it is understandable even if you're not a physicist. i certainly am not. we have six reactors in japan together at daiichi. three of them, numbers one, two, and three were on, were producing power when the earthquake hit. they automatically shut down, now it has been a matter of keeping enough water flowing into the cooling systems of the reactors to keep the hot radioacti
it for us today. i'm dylan ratigan. "hardball with chris matthews" starts right now. >>> escape from japan. let's play "hardball." >>> good evening. i'm christ matthews in washington. happy st. patrick's day. leading off tonight, high anxiety. here's how desperate it's gotten at that nuclear plant over in japan. authorities have been reduced to dumping water from helicopters and spraying water from fire trucks in a last-ditch effort to cool those spent fuel rods. in a moment, we'll hear from a nuclear power regulatory commissioner and get a report from the ground in japan. >>> also, credibility gap. the widening chasm between what the japanese government is saying and what we can believe. it happened at three mile island. it really happened at chernobyl and now it's happening at japan, officials playing down the dangers. we'll try to bridge the credibility gap tonight. >>> plus, the nuclear disaster has once again turned u.s. public opinion, obviously, against nuclear power. could have predicted that. but that hasn't stopped die-hard supporters from calling this a once-in-a-lifetime fluke
american evacuations out of japan as nuclear meltdown fears grow. >>> line of fire. security cameras capture a dramatic shootout at a tennessee convenience store. >>> and space odyssey. astronauts unveil the international space station's newest resident. good morning, everyone. i'm lynn berry. those stories and more are straight ahead. this is "first look" on msnbc. >>> we begin this morning with exit strategy. as japan's nuclear crisis deepens, and reports about the status of one of its crippled nuclear plants differ, the united states has authorized the first evacuations of americans out of japan. nbc's tracie potts joins us from washington with the very latest on this. good morning to you. >> reporter: lynn, good morning. good morning, everyone. we learned overnight these will be voluntary evacuations even though the airports have opened, commercial flights are available. the u.s. state department will now be organizing charter flights out of tokyo and other locations in japan to get americans out. the u.s. believes that the radiation levels, especially around the fukushima daiich
evacuating americans from japan as danger levels remain high at the crippled nuclear plan this, despite new attempts by military helicopters to cool off the plant's overheated reactors and fuel rods. the top u.s. nuclear regulator says conditions at the plant are much worse than japanese officials say and recommends that americans say 50 miles away. this morning questions about nearly two dozen nuclear reactors with the very same design "early" this thursday morning, march 17th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning. welcome to "the early show" here on a thursday morning. scenes from earlier. military choppers, japanese military helicopters dropping sea water on this nuclear plant a part of the last-ditch effort to bring sea water in ho help cool down the fuel pools and also the nuclear rods there at this facility. >> that is the effort from the sky. also hearing about water cannons on the ground as they try to bring things in there. we are learning this morning that the pentagon is sending in teams to assess the situation and see in a larger military presence may be needed. also
, this comes after another long day as authorities in japan were using unconventional means that i was just telling you about in their desperate race to cool down the rea reactors and it keeps the crisis in fukushima from spiraling out of control. helicopters with water and trucks with watt thor cannons were sent in to spray the reactor but none of that worked until we got the power reconnected. they couldn't even get within 50 yards of the plant with the water cannons. the head sounded the alarm that water at reactor number four had dried up and that's why we were so concerned. also today efforts were zeroed in on reactor number three and it keeps switching around as to which is the worst every day. this video was released by the tokyo electric power company showing a flyover the crippled fukushima plant. now you can see there is some major structural damage, to say the least. so maybe that's part of the reason they were in such bad shape. now authorities are just trying to keep control of the situation while they work to restore the power to the reactors. that's what they've been trying t
in japan, talking directly about the nuclear crisis for the first time. the president offering help and reassuring folks in the u.s. that they are safe. >> we are bringing all available resources to bear to closely monitor the situation and to protect american citizens who may be in harm's way. we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states, whether it's the west coast, hawaii, alaska, or u.s. territories in the pacific. >> his comments coming amid raids of rising doubts about japan's ability to control this reactor and a potential full-on meltdown. the attempt to cool down the reactors by spreading them with water dropped out of helicopters apparently having little to no impact. restoring power to the plant not happening until tomorrow at the earliest, which would resurrect the water cooling systems. radiation levels at 300 feet above the plant measured today at nearly 9 r.e.m. by comparison, a chest c.t. scan has just about 0.7 r.e.m. you have to get up to 50 to 75 r.e.m. to get immediate symptoms like hair loss as a result of exposure. so, a lot of exposu
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)